@julianhorack
Bitcoin Babaji
Consciousness awakening via yoga and other shamanic practices as taught in the Vedas and other Mystery Traditions.
65,476°
Created 20 Feb 2019
About

Independant, self-employed, free-lance writer and student of cryptocurrency and blockchain technology. Astrology consultant, trained in psychology, Vedanta philosophy, vegetarian.

Wikileaks has also posted about him multiple times, here is one twitter post: https://twitter.com/wikileaks/status/1095206826474459137
a day ago
+3
Sometimes I get the impression that this is one of the major diseases of our time: we cannot wait to express a judgement. It seems like people are always looking to place blame. For everything that happens, people are frantically looking for a scapegoat. Accidents, car crashes, fires, heart attacks, strokes... Sometimes accidents happen. Nothing more and nothing less. It seems difficult for many of us to accept that. Btw: nothing personal. It's just something that strikes me.
3 days ago
+14
nastynjka
57,999°
I have read so many publications regarding this tragedy. The most ridiculous were that it was an attack by Muslims just before the Easter. Others said that this was a political game. So many opinions, but what really happened? We will never know. What I am frustrated about is that people managed to gather more than 600M$ under 24hours to save this architectural monument.. this is all good and nice, however, if you think about it.. billionaires just gave part of the money that was available. If they donate the money to 3rd world countries, build hospitals, schools, houses.. world could become a much better place. But what people care about? FAME and appreciation. You do not get any awareness if you help those who are in need. But if you donate to renovate Notre Dame, people will talk about you. Sad truth.
a day ago
+9
14,535°
I totally agree with you. Fame is more important for rich people. If you donate to an unknown person, you won't be recognize by the society and you will finish anonymous. If you donate for Notre Dame, you are going to be recognize and maybe you will become a Knight of the Legion of Honour. That's very sad, but its the truth. But i agree that it is a big tragedy for the catholic church and the human culture.
a day ago
+4
The biggest shame of this case is that the media does not tackle this case as a struggle for journalistic freedom. In recent years, the mainstream media has done everything to delegitimise Julian Assange. The fight against his person was led by the British newspaper The Guardian and the American newspaper The New York Times. It is particularly cynical that just these two newspapers have won a lot of prestige thanks to the publication of WikiLeaks documents. However, Assange has always been very outspoken and pointed all the media, including these two, for their responsibility to keep the public from the truth about the war crimes of the US and Great Britain in Iraq. If Julian Assange is sentenced to a long term of imprisonment, any journalistic work that investigates state secrets on their truthfulness and honesty becomes impossible. The passion with which some journalists express their envy towards Julian Assange says everything about the perversion and corruption of contemporary media, who no longer see themselves as a counterpower against the government. Assange threatens to be punished for the publication of war crimes. The message is therefore clear to all media and journalists: "Limit yourself to accusing crimes of others, our opponents, our enemies. That is your role and nothing else." This actually comes down to the end of free, independent political investigative journalism.
7 days ago
+2
If you are interested in such topics, I recommend that you immerse yourself in permaculture. Permaculture originated in Australia as an answer to the major problems after the golden sixties: a growing mountain of waste, the realization that fossil energy is not inexhaustible and the increasingly clear negative effects of large-scale agriculture. Permaculture seeks to create self-sustaining systems, just like in nature. You actually try to simulate the ecosystem of your region as much as possible. If this succeeds, you have a nice yield with a minimum of energy and without waste. I took a two-week initiation course in Thailand a few years ago, and I'm still surprised by what you can achieve with a minimum of resources. I was also surprised by how little I, as a western being, knew about these design principles to become a responsible consumer. In thimes of global warming, these techniques could become really important. A good website to start with: https://permacultureprinciples.com/
9 days ago
+3
HeatherG
53,559°
I don't see photos? I've been fascinated with this concept since I was a child. My parents had friends who were "homesteading", basically living a subsistence life economically but a rich one emotionally, spiritually, and inter-personally. I've read many books, like "Farewell, My Subaru", that delve into the practicality (or lack thereof) of making small and large changes in your life to move in this direction. I have even laid out a by-the-square-foot plan for how we could satisfy about half of our plant-based food needs in the confines of our teensy suburban property. But ... I still work for a large-ish company, drive a minivan, buy more food than I want to at the grocery store (as much as I can I get directly from local farmers), etc. I WANT to do this, but it is difficult to give up the typical life to make it happen. I am hopeful that my husband's indoor growing system will enable us - at some point - to make a change like this.
9 days ago
+3
nastynjka
57,999°
Very interesting facts! I am glad you are writing such engaging publications! It's a pity that such terrible things happen to Venezuela... I hope there won't be a war because of all that things that happen there lately..
10 days ago
+1
HeatherG
53,559°
I totally read that "halflings" at first glance. Oops.
10 days ago
0